drawing.interrupted

brain-food:

big shout out to my teen years on the internet. 

(Source: stylinfcuk, via keep-calm-and-bake-a-cake)

artfulartsyamy:

White Paper is So Overrated

During my second year of teaching, I helped to open a new school. I was given a rather large budget in order to stock and supply an art room with both consumables and equipment. This was prior to the days of heavy social media usage, and I was not well-connected to other teachers of Art. I used my wits and spent most of the budget on large items like a kiln, potter’s wheel, easels, paper-cutter, scissors, lino cutters, etc. etc. It was actually very hard to spend all of that money (oh those glorious halcyon days!), but if I didn’t spend all of it by a specific date the funds would be allocated elsewhere. So, in the end, I defaulted to what I thought was practicality and bought a wide variety of white paper.

But, ugh, white paper is overrated.

It is as if we are taught that our default way of being and creating is to start off “white.”  Consider, when someone says, “start with a blank slate” we often think of an empty sheet of white paper. But, uh, last I checked, slates are dark grey or green. There are some social discourses we could have about the fact our societal default setting seems to be white (ahem), but that is a discussion for another time.  When we were little, we were given white paper on which to create. Colored paper was for cutting and gluing; not writing or drawing. And, yeah, I get that white paper might be the best for writing - what with contrast being important for legibility…But, why the heck as artists and creatives do we default to white? Well, it is probably because we remember that little sheet of white paper we were given as kids or the white paper of our coloring books.

One of the most asked questions I get is, “How do you get the kids to color so fully?”  The short answer is that I trick them; I rarely use white paper.  In Art school my professors (and yours too) made me use colored papers and conte crayons to draw. They taught me that I could use paper as a value AND that I could also use the paper to manipulate value. I got tired of my students doing (what I call) wimpy “social studies map coloring” in my Art class. It seemed to me that they were phoning-in when it came to coloring, and I was spending a ridiculous amount of time engaged in cajoling (and explaining to them) them to color more fully. So, I just thought to myself, “Enough! Enough with wasting this time. Let’s give the kids colored paper.”

So, I did. I still do. And, their work is so much stronger for it. I find them actually thinking about how the colors they put down will interact with the color of the paper. I often give them five to six different colored paper choices and I am fascinated with what they pick and how they pick it. It brings diversity to their work…And, yes, they do color more fully which lends their work a more sophisticated polish and finish.

Now, I order more colored paper than I do white paper. In fact, I ran out of white paper in November of the last school year and I never re-ordered it. I decided to see just how far we could push the colored paper. I haven’t yet found the boundary.

What about you? Do you use colored paper for drawing? 

pigeonbits:

Color palette tutorial time!

This is by no means the Only Way To Pick Colors—it’s just a relatively-simple method I use sometimes.  I’ve found it works pretty well, almost regardless of what colors you pick—as long as you can keep them organized by those light/dark warm/cool categories, and make sure one category takes up a significantly higher proportion of page space, it usually turns out pretty good!

(via artbone)

punkphantom:

malformalady:

A man after a successful heart transplant, holding his old, diseased heart

metal as fuck

punkphantom:

malformalady:

A man after a successful heart transplant, holding his old, diseased heart

metal as fuck

(via crumblybutgood)

paintbrushdrive:

sosuperawesome:

Illustrated pillows by flossypArt

These makes me want to sleep…

cross-connect:

Jesse Reno

"My art is a product of pure necessity… With no formal education I draw my inspiration from the primitive ancient cultures of Africa and South America, as well as modern pop culture."

(via artbone)

ohnodominoes:

hifructosemag:

likeafieldmouse:

Sarah Schönfeld - All You Can Feel

"Since the 1950s, we in the western world have increasingly come to understand our most intimate desires and experiences as the products of a so-called ‘chemical self’. We can explain moods, angers and diseases both physiological and psychological as an imbalance of substances in the body.

All of this, of course, takes place against the backdrop of a constantly shifting legal and political climate regarding the regulation of different types of mood-altering substances.

What do all these substances actually look like when their essence is visually depicted?

Schönfeld squeezed drops of various legal and illegal liquid drug mixtures onto negative film which had
already been exposed. Each drop altered the coating of the film.

Much like the effect of some of these substances on humans, this can be a lengthy process – sometimes one that can barely be stopped.

She then enlarged these negatives including the chemical reaction of the particular drug, to sizes of up to 160 x 200cm.”

1. Valium

2. Ketamine

3. Speed

4. Crystal Meth

5. Solian

6. Magic

7. Orphiril

8. Pharmaceutical Speed

9. Dopamine 

10. Cocaine

The literal negative effects of drugs (on negatives)

I need to talk to my dealer about scoring some “magic”…